ARC Review | The Age of Light

Title: The Age of Light

Author: Whitney Scharer

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

Expected Publication Date: February 05, 2019

Genre: Historical Fiction

Rating: 5 Stars

I was recently sent an ARC of The Age of Light by the publicists at Little, Brown and Company in exchange for an honest review. This work of historical fiction by Whitney Scharer is expected to be published on February 05, 2019.

The Age of Light is a captivating and exhilarating narrative that keeps readers emotionally invested up to the very last page. Masquerading as historical fiction, the novel recounts the life of Vogue model turned photographer, Lee Miller and her relationship with Man Ray, one of the most influential figures of the Dada and Surrealists movements ensuing Paris in the 1930s.  Continue reading “ARC Review | The Age of Light”

Novelist Chloe Aridjis on Losing Adolescence and Retaining Imagination

A subtly crafted novel about disenchantment and the innocent sense of wanderlust that incite our rashest decisions, Chloe Aridjis has poetically recreated the world of the estranged and the isolated in her new novel, Sea Monsters, set to be released on February 05, 2019 by Catapult. Author of Asunder and Book of Clouds, Aridjis carries readers into magical landscapes of suppressed fears. Sea Monsters is a hypnotic exploration of an overcast youth entrapped in the dusty and nostalgic traces of the past. Mexican history and childish imagination come together to following a young girl’s quest for the unknown, and for herself.

Arranged by the publicity team at Catapult, I spoke to Chloe about the effects of history on identity in the novel, the decadence of youth, and the intoxicating curiosity that surrounds art. Characterized as a narrative “out of a central episode of my adolescence,” ahead, Aridijis brings readers into the poetically mysterious, romantically transcendent world of Sea MonstersContinue reading “Novelist Chloe Aridjis on Losing Adolescence and Retaining Imagination”

Discussion: How Does the Blog Sparkleee

Dear fellow Babblers,

I’ve been writing on Delphine’s Babble on Some Good Reads for about seven months now. It has since then undergone some radical transformations from being a neutral place for book reviews, to also a personal diary onto which I expose my innermost raw thoughts to an insider travel manual. Lately, I’ve been doing some serious philosophical reflecting on this and what these changes my blog has seen come to define me as a human being, apart from this virtual cosmos we find ourselves lost within.

Book Blog. Book Blog and Diary. Book Blog and Diary and Traveler Reflections. This is all me. This is not 1 + 2 + 3 different bloggers. In the beginning stages of my blogging journey I believed that the blog is completely separate from the existence of it’s voice, the blogger, almost in the same way Descartes tells us the mind is separate from the body. Sitting here writing this post almost 8 months later, I now see where and how the blogger and the blog become one. It is only by fallen into unbearable lows and sadness, lifted up again and then fallen down yet again have I come to realize that the blog exists to sparkleee. And what exactly about the blog sparkles ? The blogger, course. All of the blogger’s ups downs, laughs and tears are like those clear currents that evoke the sea’s movement.
What has given my blog it’s voice, originality – everything that it is – has been me: Delphine the reader, the emotional disaster, the wanderer.

It took me some exhausting pondering to reach this seemingly common sensical conclusion, but now that I have I want to share what it is about the “me” that makes the blog “sparkleee“.  Continue reading “Discussion: How Does the Blog Sparkleee”